The Food Project: Youth. Food. Community.

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Research Reports

Learn more about The Food Project's work with young people, promoting a healthy community, and creating sustainable food systems! Read the research papers that have been written about us through the years.

2016

"GROUNDED IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD, GROUNDED IN COMMUNITY": SOCIAL CAPITAL AND HEALTH IN COMMUNITY GARDENS

Sara Shostak and Norris Guscott, 2016

(click here for PDF)

This paper describes how community gardens generate social capital, and with what potential implications for the health of gardeners and their communities.

 

2011

HEALTHY FOOD ACCESSIBILITY IN UNDERSERVED BOSTON NEIGHBORHOODS: THE AFFORDABILITY AND VIABILITY OF FARMERS' MARKETS

Robyn Lightner, April 2011

(click here for PDF, here for PPT)

This study assesses the benefits of farmers' markets on food access in low income areas, focusing in particular on the Boston Bounty Bucks incentive program for SNAP participants.

 

BOSTON FARMERS' MARKET INCENTIVE PROGRAMS: INCREASING ACCESS TO FRESH AND LOCAL PRODUCE

Aisha Amuda, February 2011

(click here for PDF)

Conducted by TFP Bill Emerson Congressional Hunger Fellow Aisha Amuda, this study evaluates the sucess of four different farmers' market coupon programs at Boston markets and makes recommendations for future programs. 

 

2010

BOSTON BOUNTY BUCKS: INCREASING ACCESS TO AND AFFORDABILITY OF
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FOR SNAP PARTICIPANTS

Gina Kim, February 2010

(click here for PDF)

Conducted by TFP Bill Emerson Congressional Hunger Fellow Gina Kim, this study is a thorough review of the Boston Bounty Bucks program's performance in 2009, with recommendations for 2010 and the future. 

 

2008

THE FOOD PROJECT: A YOUTH DEVELOPMENT MODEL FOR EL SALVADOR

Martha Morales, May 2008

(click here for PDF)

This paper was written by former TFP staffer Martha Morales as part of her master's degree in sustainable international development at Brandeis University. Morales describes the problems and opportunities youth face in El Salvador, and examines the applicability of The Food Project's programs there.

 

THE FOOD PROJECT: A FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS

Roblyn Anderson Brigham and Jennifer Nahas, March 2008

(click here for PDF)

The Food Project, in conjunction with Brigham Nahas Research Associates, conducted an alumni-follow up study. This study was designed to understand the impacts the programs have on youth participants. Youth from our Summer Youth Program, Academic Year Program, and Internship Program were interviewed and the reflections on their experiences are presented in this report. 

 

2007

BRIDGING COMMUNITIES, ADDRESSING STEREOTYPES

Lianne Fishman, June 2007

(click here for PDF)

The Summer Youth Program brings together youth from urban and non-urban areas to foster relationships between diverse high school students. For most participants, it is their first time coming into contact with people from this "other" environment. Lianne Fisman’s dissertation for the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning examines how programs can undermine racism and broad stereotypes by encouraging ties between diverse individuals, communities, and environments. She provides recommendations for programs to increase their effectiveness in this regard.

 

2005

ENGAGING YOUTH IN SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE WORK

Ivelina Borisova, September 2005

(click here for PDF)

This case study examines the motivations behind youth involvement in socially responsible work, and how to sustain this commitment over time.  She identifies motivating factors for youth, with implications for how to use this to engage young people in community work. This paper is highly informative for anyone interested in youth leadership and civic engagement.

 

2003

ROOTING THE COMMUNITY, GROWING THE FUTURE

Iris Zippora Ahronowitz, November 2003

(click here for PDF)

This essay, subtitled Two Massachusetts Urban Agriculture Organizations and their Social Impacts, examines The Food Project and Nuestras Raíces as case studies of organizations using urban agriculture as a tool for community and youth development.

The Food Project is a 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Tax ID: 04-3262532

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