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A Poem for The Food Project

Lucas (center, green) and His 2012 Summer Crew
Lucas (center, green) and His 2012 Summer Crew
The following poem was written by Food Project youth intern Lucas Munson. Lucas first joined The Food Project in the summer of 2011 as a crew worker in our Summer Youth Program. He participated in the 2011-12 Academic Year Program, worked as an assistant crew leader during the summer of 2012, and is now an intern. We are proud to announce that The Food Project will be submitting Lucas' poem as a proposal for the CTK Foundation's Heart and Soul Grant. Thank you, Lucas, for your beautiful words.

 

 

 

I remember them telling us,
The city is too loud
And the country is too quiet,
Your words will never be heard.

We responded with a carrot in the dirt,
The rolled up sleeves of a sweaty shirt.
We seized pitchforks like we'd revolt,
And planted gardens as loud as hope.

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Summer Youth Program Applications Available!


Do you like being outdoors, meeting new people, and working hard? Are you looking to make some money this summer? We are pleased to announce that the application for The Food Project's Summer Youth Program is now available!

The Food Project's Summer Youth Program brings together teenagers from diverse cultural, racial, economic, and geographic backgrounds to work on our urban and suburban farmland in Boston, Lincoln, and on the North Shore of eastern Massachusetts. Teens work on our farms, sell food at farmers' markets, work at hunger relief organizations, prepare and serve community lunches, and participate in workshops on topics such as diversity, sustainable agriculture, and personal finance.

All applicants must be 14 years old by January 1, 2013 and must not turn 18 before August 15, 2013. The application deadline is Friday, March 8, 2013

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CSA Shares Available Now!

Youth Harvesting Watermelons for the CSA
Youth Harvesting Watermelons for the CSA
On a sunny June afternoon, you are strolling up and down bountiful rows of vegetables of all sizes, shapes, and colors. As you pick your share of berries and peas for the week, you taste a few along they way. The sugar snap peas are crisp and fresh; the strawberries are sweet and tangy, and their delicious juice runs down your chin as you sink your teeth into the bright fruit. At the end of the row is the rest of your haul for the week: lettuce, spinach, arugula, swiss chard, garlic scapes, bok choi, radishes, turnips, and scallions, all grown here at The Food Project's farm in Lincoln, Mass. You take one last strawberry and gather up your bags of riches to head over to the herb garden.

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Dudley Greenhouse Seeks Seedling Proposals

Lettuce and Collard Seedlings
Lettuce and Collard Seedlings
Though the weather is still getting chillier and chillier, here at The Food Project we are already dreaming of spring. In just a few short months, the Dudley Greenhouse will be a jungle of seedlings destined for our farms, neighbors' gardens, and community gardens around Boston. Benches that are currently lying flat on our radiant-heated floor and growing various winter lettuce crops will be boosted up onto cement blocks and filled with trays of baby tomatoes, peppers, beets, kale, and many other crops that will eventually make their way outside.

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New Workshops This Winter!

The Food Project is excited to announce that we will be offering a variety of new workshops this winter through our "Grow Well, Eat Well, Be Well" workshop series!

Our gardening workshops are taught by TFP staff and youth, and will focus on growing food during the winter and preparing your garden for the spring. During our cooking workshops, The Food Project invites local gardeners and cooks into our kitchen to share recipes from their respective cultures. Participants cook together and then celebrate with a sit-down meal. 

Participants are welcome to bring children to any of our workshops. Fun and structured children's activities will be available during all Saturday workshops.

This winter, the workshops will include:

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Nominate TFP for Seeds of Change!

Massachusetts FoodCorps Service Members
Massachusetts FoodCorps Service Members
Since August 2012, eight FoodCorps Service Members have been hard at work in communities across eastern Massachusetts educating children about growing and eating healthy food through hands-on garden- and kitchen-based learning. These ambitious young leaders are working in the communities of Dorchester, Roxbury, Lynn, and Gloucester to build and expand school gardens; facilitate gardening and cooking workshops; offer taste tests; and more.

To support the work of these young educators, The Food Project is applying for a "Share the Good" grant from Seeds of Change. This winter, Seeds of Change will award twelve $10,000 grants to community-based organizations to support programs that will enhance the environmental, economic, and social well-being of gardens, farms, farmers, and communities. These grants are intended to help organizations that are working to increase access to fresh, nutritious food through community outreach and education.

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A Week of Food Celebrations

Marlie Hands Out Smoothies
Marlie Hands Out Smoothies
Last month, The Food Project celebrated Food Day in grand style by hosting celebrations at our offices and farms and attending festive events across Massachusetts. Over a period of more than a week before, on, and after Food Day, TFP staff, youth, partners, and community members participated in food-focused tours, workshops, panels, and more.

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Fall Festival and Market

Winter Crops
Winter Crops
Please join The Food Project on Tuesday, November 20th for a Fall Festival and Market in the Dudley Greenhouse! From 4:00-7:00pm, we will hold a family fun event to celebrate fall, Thanksgiving, and the end of the harvest season. 

Produce from The Food Project's farms in Dorchester and Roxbury will be available for sale, including a variety of root vegetables and greens. Come buy delicious, fresh food to adorn your Thanksgiving table or to store away for the winter. As always, we accept SNAP/EBT, WIC coupons, senior farmers' market coupons, debit, and cash.

In addition, TFP youth interns will be running fun and educational activities for children and families. Outside the greenhouse, the Mei Mei Street Kitchen food truck will be selling some delicious snacks and drinks.

We look forward to seeing you there! 

 

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Building Life Skills in the Garden

Stephanie Teaching in the Greenhouse
Stephanie Teaching in the Greenhouse
In August, The Food Project embarked on its second year as the Massachusetts host site for FoodCorps, a national nonprofit organization that works with schools to create a healthier school food environment. What follows is the first of a series of blogs profiling the FoodCorps members who are serving at The Food Project during the 2012-13 school year. 

 

"There's no [competition] to the flavor of something that is fresh and was just picked," says FoodCorps service member Stephanie Simmons. "I think that's why a lot of kids don't like vegetables - because they haven't had a chance to taste them at their best."

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Food Day Tour Highlights Agriculture in Dudley

Anna, Anthony, and Eli Lead the Tour
Anna, Anthony, and Eli Lead the Tour
On Saturday, Food Project staff, interns, community partners, and guests meandered their way around the Dudley Hub, visiting and learning about the various urban agriculture initiatives in the neighborhood. As they walked, they discussed the neighborhood highlights they saw, their own experiences with food and agriculture, and the implications of urban agriculture on this neighborhood and on the rest of the city. At one site, they paused to applaud a community gardener who had taken over an abandoned plot and donated the food he grew to hunger relief in his community. At another, they learned about the native Roxbury Russet apple variety, one of the oldest apple varieties cultivated in the United States.

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