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Lincoln/Boston CSA Newsletter

In the Share

Onions
Onions
 Salad mix/spicy salad mix
Onions
Kale or Cabbage
Melon
Lettuce/Escarole
Garlic
Mix n' Match: Scallions, basil, fennel, Hakurei turnips, summer squash, cukes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant, hot pepper
U-Pick: Edamame, herbs, raspberries, flowers, green tomatoes

News from the farm

First week of school! Want to know what to pack for your school lunches? We'll take a look at our lunch ingredients in the fields. It's looking good for those sandwich standbys such as lettuce, spicy greens, and complimentary crunchy root crops like hakurei turnips, radishes, and carrots. Cucumbers have just started kicking, so throw them in those sandwiches while they last! Your salad has no need to fear, especially if you don't mind getting adventurous and chopping up some kale finely or throwing in a little extra spicy green now and then.

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North Shore CSA newsletter

News from the farm

cabbages
cabbages
 This has been a great week on the farm. With our spading machine back in business after a couple weeks in the shop and a string of beautiful sunny days, we have been able to finish preparing the final beds of the season for planting. With a little help from the weather, we will plant our last seedlings from the greenhouse into these beds this week. This marks an important transition in the farm season: all the months of crop planning and planting have come to an end, and now we harvest and hope for a long, warm fall…..

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This week at our Boston Farmers' Markets

Dudley Town Common Farmers Market
intersection of Blue Hill Ave and Dudley Street
Tuesday and Thursdays 3-7pm

Bowdoin Street Health Center Farmers Market
230 Bowdoin St, Dorchester
Thursdays 2:30-6:30pm

Boston Medical Center Farmers Market!
Main Lobby, Massachusetts Ave.
Fridays 11am-2pm

This Week

We'll have: Kale, Sungold Cherry Tomatoes, Big Beef Tomatoes, Brandywine Heirloom Tomatoes, Red and Yellow Onions, Green Beans, Eggplant, Japanese Eggplant, Beets, Carrots, Summer Squash, Scallions, Collard Greens, Salad Mix, Lettuce, Basil, Apples, and Pears

Volunteer days are Tuesdays, Thursdays (starting this week) and Saturdays (starting September 12) from 9:30 am to 12:30 pm through October 31st. Every Tuesday and Thursday, we'll be harvesting the produce that goes to market. On Saturdays, volunteers are led in doing field work by the awesome young people in the Academic Year Program. Come meet them!

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North Shore CSA newsletter

News from the farm

bunching scallions
bunching scallions
 During the last few weeks, we’ve had a nice string of sun and heat. This has allowed us to direct seed and transplant several rounds of fall crops so far, and with a little cooperation from the weather, we will get in another round of planting by the end of August. On the down side, our tomatoes have finally succumbed to late blight. They held out longer than other organic farms in the area, but with late blight so widespread in our area, it was really just a matter of time. We will include the last of the tomatoes in this week’s share.

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Lincoln/Boston CSA Newsletter

In the Share

Lettuce and Salad mix
Chard, Collards, Turnip Greens or Kale
Garlic
Leeks
Pesto Basil
Melons!
Mix and Match: carrots, eggplant, peppers, fennel, summer squash, scallions, cucumbers, potatoes

In the Field

Herbs
Flowers
Raspberries (!)
Edamame (baby soybeans)*

(*Note on cooking edamame: pull the pods off the plant and boil or steam the whole pod until the pod is tender enough to squeeze the beans out easily (usually about ten minutes). Add a little salt and enjoy! Eat the beans and not the pod.)

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North Shore CSA newsletter

News from Melissa Dimond, North Shore Director

This week marks the halfway point for the CSA season, and as such seems like a good time to reflect on where we've been and where we're going. I have had the opportunity to speak with many members this season - in person, by phone, and via email. So many of you have expressed the excitement and joy that comes with picking up your weekly shares. And many people have asked why the volume of food is smaller than they expected.

A Season Like No Other

It's been a season of extremes, and I cannot thank you enough for your support. The sustained rain in June hit at precisely the worst time - causing disease and crop failure on local farms all over the area, including The Food Project's land in Ipswich & Beverly. We are still feeling the effects of the crop and seedling loss in June and July.

We know from our own experience farming and running a CSA program (in Lincoln) for nearly 20 years that we have not seen anything like this before. And our colleagues on other local farms have the same message. It's unprecedented.

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Lincoln/Boston CSA Newsletter

In the Share

Lettuce and Salad mix
Chard, Collards or Cabbage
Garlic
Sweet Alisa Craig Onions
Pesto Basil
Mix and Match: carrots, eggplant, peppers, fennel, summer squash, scallions, cucumbers

In the Field

Green beans
Herbs
Flowers
Raspberries (!)
Edamame (baby soybeans)*

(*Note on cooking edamame: pull the pods off the plant and boil or steam the whole pod until the pod is tender enough to squeeze the beans out easily (usually about ten minutes). Add a little salt and enjoy! Eat the beans and not the pod.)

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North Shore CSA newsletter

From the Interns

close up of some lettuce
close up of some lettuce
 In the Internship Program skits are a consistent activity. Each Tuesday a group of interns presents a skit to the Summer Youth Program on the veggie of the week. This is a way to get the teenagers excited about vegetables. One of the more popular skits we’ve presented this summer is the story of Letushca, god of Lettuce.

Long ago animals roamed freely through the forest (sheep and horse run across the stage). The local villagers would hunt the animals for food. But soon the animals became faster and harder to catch. (Scene goes to a mother and her son.) “ Oh son, go and collect us something to eat, or else we will die from hunger.”

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Lincoln/Boston CSA Newsletter

In the Share

Lettuce and Salad mix
Chard, Collards or Cabbage
Garlic
Sweet Alisa Craig Onions
Mix and Match: carrots, eggplant, peppers, fennel, summer squash, potatoes

In the Field

Green, wax and flat beans
herbs
flowers
taste of cherry tomatoes

News from the farm

Japanese Eggplant
Japanese Eggplant
 Summer seems to have set in. Our eggplant continue to grow and the peppers seem to be catching up. Every few days we venture into the melon field to check on the swelling orbs of sweetness and crack one open to see how they are progressing. We're expecting them any day now in this heat. It looks to be a good melon year after all. Even though the melon sweetness of summer has yet to be tasted, we are focused on fall this time of year.

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North Shore CSA newsletter

Veggie of the Week: Onions

cleaning onions
cleaning onions
 Onions are plants of the species Allium cepa, which originated in central Asia but has spread across the globe in hundreds of different varieties.
The key to the onion family's appeal is a strong, often pungent, sulfury flavor whose original purpose was to deter animals from eating the plants. Cooking transforms this chemical defense into a deliciously savory, almost meaty quality that adds depth to many dishes. The onion family accumulates energy stores not in starch, but in chains of fructose sugars which long, slow cooking breaks down to produce a marked sweetness.

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