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One Click, $100,000 for Real Food

Dear Food Project Friends and Supporters,

We have some exciting news – our own David Schwartz of the Real Food Challenge is one of five finalists for the VH1 Do Something Award! If David wins, the Real Food Challenge will get $100,000 to help galvanize this movement to bring fresh, local food to college campuses. The award will be presented on a national live broadcast on VH1, bringing the message of the Real Food Challenge to a huge audience!

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TFP Launches MA FoodCorps Initiative

 

The Food Project is excited to launch a major new effort to increase affordable, local food access for low-income children and their families in eastern Massachusetts. Beginning this fall, in partnership with CitySprouts and Boston Public Schools (BPS), TFP will be working on farm-to-school and school gardening projects in Boston, Lynn, and Gloucester. We are calling this partnership the Massachusetts FoodCorps Initiative.

This work is made possible by FoodCorps, a new AmeriCorps program that places service members for one year in high-need communities to improve children’s education about and access to healthy, locally grown food.

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Request for Proposals from Boston Partners

Following a successful pilot program last summer, The Food Project is excited to release a call for proposals for our 2011 Farm Fresh Coupon Program. Through this effort, we will partner with other Boston agencies to promote the consumption of fresh, healthy, local, affordable food with coupons that are redeemable for fresh fruits and vegetables at local farmers' markets. The distribution of these coupons will be paired with partner agencies' existing health-related activities to create a holistic approach to health, nutrition and well-being in underserved communities.

The Food Project is requesting responses no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, May 20th, 2011. Please help us to get the word out by sharing this RFP with your peers and colleagues. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the program coordinator, Max Gitlen, at [email protected].

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Farm to Family + Groupon = Fresh & Healthy

Exciting news that just went out to our mailing list...   Not on the list, but want to be?  click here

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TFP Partners with FoodCorps & CitySprouts


    

Application
Deadline:

April 10, 2011

 

 

 

TFP Launches Program to Address Child Nutrition and Obesity

The Food Project is excited to announce a groundbreaking, collaborative project that will improve education about and access to healthy food for schoolchildren, parents, and other members of school communities. A partnership with Cambridge, MA-based CitySprouts, this program will also address childhood obesity and diet-related health problems.

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Changing Seasons, Changing Faces

As we get ready for another growing season, we’d like to thank and bid a fond farewell to departed staff and welcome new members of The Food Project team.

Miriam and son Zalen on the farm.
Miriam and son Zalen on the farm.
This past December, former Director of Agriculture and long time Lincoln farmer Miriam Stason left us after eight years helping us grow farm-fresh food. In life off the farm, Miriam will be focused on raising her young family, which will grow to four when she gives birth to her second child in late March. Taking up the reins as our new agriculture director is Tim Laird, who will continue to manage the Baker Bridge farm in Lincoln. Pedro Ghirotti will be joining Tim as our new field manager. We're excited to have Pedro working on a soil fertility plan that should help make our fields more productive in the coming season and for years to come.

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Reflections on NE Food & Justice Summit

Anim Steel, Real Food Challenge cofounder and Food Project national programs director addresses over 500 NE Food & Justice Summit attendees.
Anim Steel, Real Food Challenge cofounder and Food Project national programs director addresses over 500 NE Food & Justice Summit attendees.
From where I stand, the weekend was a huge success. It was what we hoped for and more. The event showed that there is a movement ready to burst out there: over 500 youth showed up at Northeastern University. If it hadn’t been for a snowstorm, we would probably have had over 650. The registrations were pouring in at the end.

And this wasn’t just the “choir.” There were many young people there who were pretty new to the issue of food.

The diversity of the crowd was striking in other ways. The Summit was attended by young people from some of the most and least privileged places in this country, from inner cities to Ivy Leagues and in-between. I hope—I think—we created an environment with the ethos of The Food Project: looking injustice in the face while also creating common ground—a deeply respectful space. 

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Urban Ag, Conceptual Art, and Apple Trees

The Food Project is excited to endorse the Boston Tree Party, the first initiative of our friends at Hybrid Vigor Projects. The Boston Tree Party is a collaborative campaign to plant 100 pairs of heirloom apple trees in publicly used spaces across Greater Boston. The tree plantings will be undertaken in partnership with a diverse range of institutions, organizations, businesses, and communities.

The Boston Tree Party is at once an urban agriculture project and a conceptual art project. It aims to create vital gathering places, build community connections, and improve community health while it engages with metaphor and symbolism, and playfully reimagines patriotic and political language, imagery, and forms of association.

For more information about the Boston Tree Party and to learn about ways to participate, visit the project’s website.

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TFP Intern Impresses at Museum of Science

(left to right) Ken Kaplan of MIT, Food Project Intern Alvin Andino, and Karen Spiller of Boston Collaborative for Food and Fitness take part in a Q & A session at the Museum of Science's Let's Talk about Food forum.
(left to right) Ken Kaplan of MIT, Food Project Intern Alvin Andino, and Karen Spiller of Boston Collaborative for Food and Fitness take part in a Q & A session at the Museum of Science's Let's Talk about Food forum.
On Friday, January 21, The Food Project made a big splash at the first session of the Museum of Science's "Let's Talk about Food" forum series. The many attendees who came despite the evening's cold weather saw the best of The Food Project, represented by Intern Alvin Andino. With passion and poise, he described the organization he's worked with the past two and half years, focusing on the impact TFP youth programs have made on him and other youth he's known.

"It's important to educate people when they're young about good food and healthy eating habits," Alvin told the audience. "These habits can be set for a lifetime so it's important to reach youth with this message."

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How to Keep Gardens Safe

Recently, new findings from research led by Dan Brabander of Wellesley College, conducted in partnership with The Food Project, have been reported by various media. They show that lead particles in urban soil can move over time, perhaps by wind or rain, and settle on the top layer of clean compost inside of raised beds. Because these findings are likely to cause concern, we want to make sure that people, especially urban gardeners, understand fully what they mean. The good news is that gardeners can take simple yet effective steps to keep their gardens safe.

Importantly, gardening in raised beds is still highly encouraged in places where contaminated soil is prevalent. It’s also important to know that the movement of particles happens over time – generally, at least a season must pass before changes in soil quality can be observed. So proper maintenance of raised beds should minimize or eliminate concerns.

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