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Interested in Growing Seedlings for Gardening Projects? Dudley Greenhouse Invites Proposals

Seedlings - Dudley Greenhouse
Seedlings - Dudley Greenhouse
Dudley residents have incredible expertise and energy around food. Our neighbors have built so many creative mechanisms to access the great food they want in their community.” – Sutton Kiplinger, Greater Boston Regional Director, The Food Project

We are currently accepting applications from groups interested in growing seedlings at the Dudley Greenhouse for use in gardening projects. Application Deadline: January 13, 2016 – 5 p.m. Apply online now.

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Interested in Growing Seedlings for Gardening Projects? Dudley Greenhouse Invites Proposals

Seedlings - Dudley Greenhouse
Seedlings - Dudley Greenhouse
Dudley residents have incredible expertise and energy around food. Our neighbors have built so many creative mechanisms to access the great food they want in their community.” – Sutton Kiplinger, Greater Boston Regional Director, The Food Project

We are currently accepting applications from groups interested in growing seedlings at the Dudley Greenhouse for use in gardening projects. Application Deadline: January 15, 2016 – 5 p.m. Apply now.

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Despite a blanket of snow there's lots of activity in our greenhouse


The farm is looking like it will never emerge from underneath this insulating blanket of snow. The tiny microfauna in the topsoil have not seen light or even a fluctuation in temperature for quite some time now. Although, this is probably normal for them—they adapted to the cycles of the planet eons ago. 


Inside the heated greenhouse it’s a different picture entirely. The entire allium family, such as onions and garlic, has been seeded in trays. The seeding happened in two days with the help of Dirt Crew. What little daylight there is shines through the double layer of inflated plastic, bringing the temperature up to nearly 50 degrees—the propane-powered heaters barely need to turn on.

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Waiting for spring on our farms in Lynn

       

 
Here in Lynn, we are buried under record-breaking piles of snow. It’s icy, dirty snow, the kind that’s been around for too long but has nowhere to go. It’s March snow.      

At the Munroe Street and Ingalls School farm plots, a sea of snow has replaced the rows of vegetables that welcomed me to The Food Project last fall. The gardens, just like us, wait for spring. 

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Think Spring - Planting Onion Seeds


 

Youth in The Food Project’s Dirt Crew program began planting onion seeds in 250 flats in the greenhouse in Lincoln last Saturday. When grown, these 75,000 seeds will produce over an acre of onions at  Baker Bridge Farm.

 

Youth and volunteers will return in early April to transplant the seedlings into the ground.

 

It's not too early to sign up for a CSA and enjoy fresh produce when its harvested. 

 

 

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Winter view on the farm

A reflection by Allison Houghton, Greater Boston CSA Manager
 


I am constantly being reminded of how many animals live on or near a farm’s borders, even in winter. Recently, on the Lincoln farm, I saw a red fox hiding amongst our cabbages. I imagine it must have been waiting for rabbits or field mice to emerge from hiding. It was fun to watch him sit up and stare back at us as we came closer. Then quick as anything, it leapt to its feet and rushed off towards the cover of trees, its red tail flowing behind him like a banner.
 

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It’s Time for a Statewide Food Systems Plan

Massachusetts is about to embark on a food system strategic planning process. This is welcome news as it will make our state among the frontrunners in recognizing and acting on the critical connections between food, municipal priorities, and the health and economic development of local communities.

Food systems planning means that issues around growing, processing, transporting, preparing, buying, and disposing of food are integrated into policies and plans at all levels of government.

Currently, without a larger food systems plan in place, the state’s many local food councils tasked with addressing food policy concerns end up focusing on individual projects and immediate needs.

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Lynn Farmers Market Is Open!

Youth Sell Produce at the Market
Youth Sell Produce at the Market
The Food Project is excited to announce that our Lynn Central Square farmers market is open for the season! The Lynn market will run on Thursdays from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the corner of Union Street and Exchange Street through October 31. 

Each week, teens from The Food Project's Summer Youth Program and Internship Program sell freshly-harvested vegetables, fruits, and herbs at the Lynn market. This week's bounty includes lettuce, cucumbers, summer squash, green beans, garlic, calaloo, radishes, turnips, cabbage, onions, carrots, beets, fennel, leeks, scallions, basil, cilantro, dill, and more!

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A Garden at West Cottage: Planning

A Handful of Seeds
A Handful of Seeds
Over the course of the growing season, TFP staff member Allison Daminger, along with our Boston interns, will be blogging about their experiences tending two 4 ft x 8 ft raised bed gardens located on The Food Project's farm in Dorchester. Although Allison and the youth have learned a lot through osmosis - when you work for The Food Project, it's hard not to pick up at least the basics of growing food! - watching and assisting others is quite different from having one's own garden. We hope that reading about their mistakes and successes over the course of the growing season will encourage other aspiring gardeners to dive in with a little less fear!

 

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Meet the Crew Leaders: Keely Curliss


Nineteen-year-old Keely Curliss first worked with The Food Project as a crew worker in the North Shore Summer Youth Program in 2008. After that, she spent the next four years exploring different roles in TFP's youth programs. She was a member of DIRT Crew and an assistant crew leader for DIRT Crew, and held multiple academic year and summer internships. In addition, Keely served as a youth member of TFP's board of trustees for two years.

Keely just returned to her hometown of Cambridge, Mass., after spending a year serving as a City Year corps member in Baton Rouge, La. After a long year away, Keely will be returning this summer as a crew leader in The Food Project's Greater Boston Summer Youth Program.

 

What was your experience like as a youth in The Food Project's programs?

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