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Mother Caroline Students Discover Growing

A Student Plants Collards
A Student Plants Collards
Standing in a misshapen circle in the center of the Dudley Greenhouse's community bay, 12 middle school girls share their favorite food memories. They share delicious stories about eating new foods during their travels, sweet stories about cooking with their families, and funny stories about sharing snacks with their friends at school.

It is the first day in the greenhouse for a new group of 5th through 8th grade girls from the Mother Caroline Academy in Dorchester, Mass. Girls from Mother Caroline have been visiting their four raised-bed gardens in the community bay of the greenhouse each week since the fall of 2011. The students grow vegetables in the greenhouse, learn about food systems and food justice, and visit Cooking Matters to learn to cook some of the vegetables that they have grown.

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Somali Gardeners Lead Cooking Workshop

RIAC coordinator Saida helps with the workshop.
RIAC coordinator Saida helps with the workshop.
Greenhouse gardeners Fadumo Khiere and Rahma Farah led friends, neighbors, and cooking enthusiasts in a cooking class about Somali food on Saturday, February 25 in the kitchen at The Food Project's office in Dorchester.

Fadumo and Rahma are gardeners from the Refugee and Immigrant Assistance Center (RIAC) who have been tending three garden plots in the Dudley Greenhouse for the past five months. In their plots, they are growing a variety of cold weather crops, including lettuce, spinach, collard greens, broccoli, cilantro, and cauliflower. Recently, they planted peas and green beans to be harvested in the coming months.

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Grow Well Workshop Tonight POSTPONED

Due to the snow forecasted for this evening, tonight's Grow Well Workshop 2: "Start Your Own Seeds" has been cancelled. The workshop has been rescheduled for Wednesday, March 7, from 6:00 - 7:30pm at the Dudley Greenhouse, 11 Brook Ave, Roxbury, MA.

Please contact Community Food Coordinator Danielle Andrews for more information about the rescheduled workshop.

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Refugees Share Culture in Dudley Greenhouse

TFP staff Jennie Msall works with BCRHHR members.
TFP staff Jennie Msall works with BCRHHR members.
Each Friday, a group of refugees and clinicians from the Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights (BCRHHR) meet at the Boston Medical Center and walk the mile to the Dudley Greenhouse together. At the greenhouse, they are welcomed by TFP staffers Jennie Msall and Danielle Andrews, who lead them into the community bay, where they have been hard at work all winter. Soon, they sink their hands into the dirt and settle into the work of cultivating their three raised-bed gardens, in which they grow a variety of vegetables, including plants from their home countries. As they tend their crops, the refugees discuss their lives in Boston, methods for growing food in small spaces, and what they cook and eat here in Boston and in their home countries.

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“Eat Well” Features Somali Cuisine

Eat Well: Somali Cuisine
Eat Well: Somali Cuisine
The Food Project invites you to learn about Somali cuisine with Fadumo Kheire, who will present the second session in our “Eat Well” series of workshops. Fadumo is a community gardener with RIAC, one of nine groups working in the community bays in the Dudley Greenhouse. She will lead us in preparing two Somali dishes.

Eat Well: Connecting to gardens through culture and cooking
Cooking with Your Neighbor - Somali Cuisine
* Saturday, February 25, 12 - 1:30 p.m., RSVP REQUIRED

Download a flyer for more information.

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Local Gardener Leads Cooking Workshop

Maria Barros prepares bacalhau.
Maria Barros prepares bacalhau.
Local gardener Maria Barros led friends, neighbors, and food enthusiasts in a cooking class about Cape Verdean cooking at The Food Project’s office this Saturday, January 28.

The ten participants included Cape Verdean Bostonians eager to learn about their traditional cuisine, as well as many local gardeners. As they chopped vegetables for the class, the gardeners discussed last year's cabbage crop and their excitement to plant collard greens for the spring.

Barros led participants in preparing two traditional Cape Verdean dishes called Cachupa and Bacalhau. Cachupa is a stew that contains collard greens, beans, and corn. Bacalhau is a stew containing salted cod. After preparing the two dishes, participants dined together to taste their creations.

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New TFP Workshop Series Starting Soon

Coming up soon at The Food Project, we’ll be presenting our new “Grow Well, Eat Well, Be Well” workshop series. In these sessions, we will explore gardening topics, share cultural recipes, connect you with other gardeners from your neighborhood, and more. These workshops are the beginnings of some exciting new opportunities coming up – you won’t want to miss them!

Grow Well: Bringing your gardening skills to a new level
Planning Your Garden
* Saturday, January 21, 10:00 – 11:30 A.M. OR
* Tuesday, January 24, 6:00 – 7:30 P.M.

This is the first workshop in our Grow Well series. Through this interactive workshop on designing your garden, you can get help with everything from planning its layout to ordering seeds. Other topics in this series will include: how to start seeds, planting tips, and how to dealing with pests and diseases.

Download a flyer for more information.

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Interns in the Garden

[The first part of this blog was written by Sylvia, a TFP summer intern. In the second part, Sylvia is the featured gardener in this month’s installment of "A Week in My Garden."]

TFP Intern Sylvia at work on her raised-bed garden.
TFP Intern Sylvia at work on her raised-bed garden.
My name is Sylvia and I am one of the twelve Boston interns at The Food Project. Our internship is divided into three groups in which we rotate: Agriculture (AG), Teaching through Agriculture (TAG), and Build-a-Garden (BaG).

During our time in AG we get the opportunity to teach community members about the food system through our Food Choices Workshop. As part of TAG, we have the opportunity to educate and inform children from the ages of 5 to 18 about healthy food choices at our Urban Learning Farm (ULF).

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Pre-order Garlic Now for Fall Planting

A head of freshly harvested garlic with many more to clean!
A head of freshly harvested garlic with many more to clean!

With all of this talk about harvesting garlic, I'm sure many of you are eager to grow it for the first time or plant even more than last year! We will be announcing our Compost & Garlic Fest in next month's newsletter, and in the meantime plan ahead. We'll be ordering seed garlic for planting. To guarantee garlic, you must pre-order.

How to Pre-Order:

Each head of garlic will be $5, and generally 1 head covers about 1 square foot in a raised bed. To pre-order, please mail a check made out to The Food Project by August 31. Please include your name, email and/or phone number, and # of garlic heads you'd like.


Send checks to:

The Food Project
Attn: Kathleen Banfield
555 Dudley St
Dorchester Ma, 02125

Questions? Email [email protected]

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A Week in My Garden: Guest Spotlight

James Modi has a unique gardening arrangement at his Lynn home. Through a partnership with the GRO Project (Gardening through Refugee Organizations) and The Food Project, he shares 20 raised beds with almost 20 gardeners from his native Sudan, many of whom were small scale farmers in rural areas back home. Stemming from a need for their ethnic foods (think sweet potato leaf) and a desire to continue their farming tradition, the garden is tended and harvested communally - extra produce is sold at the New American Center in Lynn, providing supplementary income for many.

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