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Saturday's Climate Action Day

Underwater Cabinet Meeting
Underwater Cabinet Meeting
 Food crops require certain things from our environment to grow, including the right amount of rain (not like this past June!) and the proper range of temperature. Significant changes to the climate threaten to disrupt these conditions.

If, then, you also enjoy eating food, you may wish to join our friends at the Real Food Challenge, Slow Food, and hundreds of like-minded organization in participating in this Saturday's international day of climate action. The basic idea is to show world leaders, a month in advance of the climate negotiations at Copenhagen, that there is widespread support for a treaty that will keep atmospheric carbon dioxide levels down somewhere reasonable.

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News from the North Shore Farms

CSA Survey

We depend on your feedback to help shape next year's planning. In order to make sure we get your input, we have set up an online survey: CSA Survey. It is very short and simple, and your participation helps us a ton. We are also leaving printed surveys at each site this week in case you would prefer to participate this way. Thank you!!!

Blog Note

As you may have already seen, we're experimenting with carving the farm newsletters up into blog posts a little differently this week. Your North Shore recipe is in the preceding post: Simple Miso Soup.

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Simple Miso Soup

I’m not 100% sure what triggered this, it may have been Sundays 59-0 Patriots snow infused dismantling of the Titans or that the fields have transitioned from summer crops to fall, but I started thinking about miso soup today. Most seasons the transition from ratatouille to miso soup isn’t as pronounced. The 2009 season has yet again surprised me.

Simple Miso Soup a la today’s share:

Ingredients:

Olive oil
3 or 4 carrots cut thin
2 or 3 leeks cut thin
2 or 3 bok choy , both stems and leaves cut thin
miso, 5 or 6 tsp (I use traditional red and well worth a special trip to the supermarket)
block of tofu, cubed
water
crushed black pepper and soy sauce (tamari) to taste

Preparation:

Add olive oil, carrots, and leeks into a pan and sauté until carrots are less crunchy (approx 10 minutes).

Add bok choy, tofu, and water to just cover the veggies and cook until bok choy is tender.

Remove from heat and add miso (follow directions for use on miso container).

Add crushed pepper and soy sauce to taste.

 

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This Week at our Boston Markets

Dudley Town Common Farmers Market
intersection of Blue Hill Ave and Dudley Street
Tuesday and Thursdays
new time: 3-6pm for the rest of the season
Through Oct 29!!

Bowdoin Street Health Center Farmers Market
230 Bowdoin St, Dorchester
Thursdays
new time: 3-6pm for the rest of the season
Through Oct 29!!

We have just have one more week of markets left after this one! We're now closing at sunset - 6pm - this week and next.

This Week

We'll have: Leeks, Cilantro, Radishes, Beets, Carrots, Potatoes, Shelling Beans, Cabbage, Collard Greens, Swiss Chard, Kale, Spicy Salad Mix, Lettuce Mix, Parsley, the last of the Peppers, and (Apples and, if our luck continues, Corn, on Thursday)

Your Farmers

We realized that we've neglected all this time to introduce you to those of us who have been growing your vegetables and running the stands.

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Potato Leek Soup

1 cup butter
2 leeks, sliced
salt and pepper to taste
1 quart chicken broth
1 tablespoon cornstarch
4 cups Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced
2 cups heavy cream

1. In a large pot over medium heat, melt butter. Cook leeks in butter with salt and pepper until tender, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes.
2. Stir cornstarch into broth and pour broth into pot. Add the potatoes and bring to a boil. Season with salt and pepper. Pour in the cream, reduce heat and simmer at least 30 minutes, until potatoes are tender. Season with salt and pepper before serving.

Bon Appetite!

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Brussels Sprouts

Yet another vegetable transformed by the weather, Brussels sprouts, after hard frosts like we had last week, are sweet and a bit nutty, nothing like the bitter, probably grey, overcooked sulfurous brassica you might have been served as a child. We like them so much better after the frost that we always wait until late October to harvest them. Snap the sprouts off the stalk to enjoy this nutritious seasonal treat high in fiber, vitamins A and C, potassium and iron. While some boil the sprouts, stir fry them or peel them and cook the leaves individually, my favorite Brussels sprout mouthfuls have all been roasted so here are two suggestions for how to go about it:

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

www.thefoodnetwork.com

1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts
3 tablespoons good olive oil
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

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News from the Lincoln Farm

Only one week left to go after this.

The Cold Arrives

Though temperatures are supposed to rise close to 70 this week, last week we saw the first of the true cold weather. With the first hard frost there is sometimes a sigh of relief among the farm crew. After all the labor of the season, we finally allow ourselves to relax once the pepper plants droop and the basil turns brown. There is still plenty of harvesting to be done, but now we get to set our alarm clocks a bit later, waiting until the sun rises and the frost loosens its grip on the lettuce to begin work. Here in New England the weather sets the pace, slowing down life for the colder months. We are helpless to resist it. When snow falls in October, as it did on us last Friday, we find work to do under cover, take the time to heat up our lunches and enjoy early bedtimes. Even the weeds have lost their sense of urgency and begin to take a little rest. Enjoy these last two weeks of produce fresh from the ground- the roots and greens are made sweeter by the frost, crisper by the cold and more precious by their impermanence.

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Lincoln & Box Share CSA survey and renewal forms

Did you participate in the Lincoln On-Farm CSA, or get one of our Boston-area Box Shares? If so, we'd appreciate it if you could fill out a brief survey, and we hope that you'll want to fill out the renewal form for next year.

On-Farm

2009 Survey
Renewal form (PDF)

Box Share

2009 Survey
Renewal form (PDF)

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North Shore CSA Event Location Change

Even in the Rain
Even in the Rain
 As you have probably heard, the weather tomorrow is looking to be very cold and probably wet.

Given this, and the fact that everyone who has RSVP'ed for tomorrow's event picks up their share in either Swampscott or Lynn, we've decided to move the event to our office at 120 Munroe St. in Lynn.

We will be having a potluck lunch in the warmth at our office from 12- 1 PM, followed by tours of our new urban farm on Munroe street, and cider pressing.

Hope to see you there!

Best regards, James Harrison

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North Shore CSA Newsletter

News from the Farm

Dear Members,

We hope to see you at Long Hill at our Fall Fiesta this coming Saturday. We'll be having a potluck lunch from 12:00 - 1:00 PM, and then will be pressing apple cider afterwards with our old-time cider press until 3:30 PM. Please join us for all or part of the day.

During my pre-farmer days (while in college) I read a passage from Hermann Hesse’s Beneath the Wheel that struck me with the beauty of Fall and of sharing a harvest. I found the passage on Google books just now:

The crunching of the apples sounded harsh but appetizing. Anyone passing by who heard this sound could not help reaching for an apple and taking a bite. The sweet cider poured out of the pipes in a thick stream, reddish-yellow, sparkling in the sun. Anyone passing by who saw this could not help asking for a glass, taking a sip and then just standing there, his eyes moistened by a sense of well-being and sweetness which surged through him. And this sweet cider filled the air far and wide with its delicious fragrance.

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