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from the fields

The Food Project's blog

Dudley Farmers' Market News

Intersection of Blue Hill Ave and Dudley Street, Roxbury
Tuesday and Thursdays
3-7pm

At the Market

Green Peppers
Eggplant
Garlic
Shell Beans
Green Beans
Green Tomatoes
Red Slicing Tomatoes
Cherry Tomatoes
Calalloo
Cucumbers
Carrots
Collard Greens
Swiss Chard
Scallions
Basil
Sage
Summer Squash
Corn (Thursday only)
Nashoba Brook Bakery Bread (Thursday only)

EBT/Food Stamp/SNAP, WIC and Senior Farmers Market Coupons, Debit and Cash Accepted! All season, any EBT/Food Stamp/SNAP purchase will be matched up to $10 at twenty Farmers Markets in Boston, including the Dudley Town Common Market.

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News from the Lincoln Fields

Since our summer program started in June we have harvested roughly 14,000 pounds of produce and from this we have donated thousands of pounds to our shelter, soup kitchen, and pantry partners. To give you an idea of how we accomplish this task, let me introduce you to our Tuesday harvest. The day starts at 6:30am when the farm staff works hard to harvest greens and lettuce before the sun starts beating on them. As the youth arrive on the farm, crews quickly go out to the fields and the task of harvesting 2,000 lbs of produce begins. As crates upon crates of squash, carrots, and potatoes arrive at the wash station, one crew works on weighing, recording, washing, and packing for each different destination. After lunch it’s off to the city as we deliver the Cambridge, Somerville, and Arlington CSA shares, drop off produce at five hunger relief organizations, and then to our farmers’ market in Roxbury—all in two hours!

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Dudley Town Common Farmers Market News

At the Market

Garlic
Shell Beans
Potatoes
Green Beans
Green Tomatoes
Cherry Tomatoes
Calalloo
Cucumbers
Carrots
Beets
Collard Greens
Swiss Chard
Radishes
Scallions
Basil
Sage
Summer Squash
Raspberries
Nashoba Brook Bakery Bread (on Thursday only)

EBT/Food Stamp/SNAP, WIC and Senior Farmers Market Coupons, Debit and Cash Accepted! All season, any EBT/Food Stamp/SNAP purchase will be matched up to $10 at twenty Farmers Markets in Boston, including the Dudley Town Common Market.

Vegetable of the Week: Green Tomatoes

I have learned that green tomato lovers are hard-core. Last year, we'd hear folks, stopped at red lights, yelling from their car at us - and they most often wanted to know if we were selling green tomatoes. Others would buy 20 lbs worth, because apparently it's not always easy to find green tomatoes around town. A couple of weeks ago, I received a call on my cell from a shopper I didn't recognize by name, double-checking that we'd have them at the market that afternoon.

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Obama Cabinet Member Visits The Food Project’s Boston Farm

scenes from the Secretary's visit
scenes from the Secretary's visit
President Obama’s Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius, stopped by our West Cottage Farm in Dorchester the other week! She took a tour of TFP’s urban agricultural oasis and visited with 35 of our teens working on the farm. The event highlighted our work under a recent grant from the Boston Public Health Commission and the Centers for Disease Control. We were held up as a national model for obesity prevention in low- income neighborhoods.

The local media did a great job of covering the Secretary’s visit. The Boston Globe captured the mood of the special morning. Check out their article and video, which include the Secretary’s comments, as well as the experiences of some of our youth.

The photos

1. Secretary Sebelius looks on and listens intently as Food Project interns Valerie and Phil speak about their work.

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Dudley Town Common Farmers Market News

Intersection of Blue Hill Ave and Dudley Street, Roxbury
Tuesday and Thursdays
3-7pm

At the Market

Garlic
Raspberries
Shell Beans
Green Beans
Calalloo
Fava Beans
Cucumbers
Carrots
Cabbage
Salad Mix
Collard Greens
Swiss Chard
Radishes
Salad Turnips
Scallions
Basil
Summer Squash
Peaches and Plums (possibly only on Tuesday)
Nashoba Brook Bakery Bread (only on Thursday)

EBT/Food Stamp/SNAP, WIC and Senior Farmers Market Coupons, Debit and Cash Accepted! All season, any EBT/Food Stamp/SNAP purchase will be matched up to $10 at twenty Farmers Markets in Boston, including the Dudley Town Common Market.

News From The Field

Usually, my news from the field consist mostly of my musings about farming and what's happening on our farm sites in Roxbury and Dorchester. This week, Globe and WBZ TV reporters were sharing their news stories from the field.

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The Wonders of Weeding

Weeding is an important part of maintaining your garden. Regular weeding (at least once a week) is most beneficial because it's more manageable and they won't grow too big, which will prevent weeds from stealing too much space, water, and nutrients from the plants you actually want in your garden. Some plants eventually go to seed if not weeded right away, which will result in more weeds growing in your garden.

Sometimes the hardest part of weeding is being able to differentiate between the weeds and plants you seeded. While labeling what you plant and keeping an accurate map of your garden bed can help with plant identification of what you planted, it is even better to know a little about the weeds you are pulling up!

Check out this chart (4 MB PDF) with some of the most common weeds you'll find in your garden. Remember, not all weeds are "bad!" We distinguish between edible and nutritious ones and those you can just get rid of!

 

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Checking in on Your Gardens

by intern Mayra Class

Build-a-Garden interns
Build-a-Garden interns
It's summertime and here at The Food Project, that means we are working in full force. I am 16 years old and I started at The Food Project last summer as a crew worker in our Summer Youth Program. Now I am at the intern level, which means I have grown as a worker and I have a better understanding of what it means to work hard and build a better community. In fact, this summer, eight interns joined the Boston internship to work alongside Kesiah and Kathleen on many projects, and one of our main focuses is the Build-a-Garden Program.

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Fava Beans

purple fava beans
purple fava beans
It is believed that along with lentils, peas, and chickpeas, fava beans became part of the eastern Mediterranean diet around 6000 BC or earlier. They are still often grown as a cover crop to prevent erosion, both because they can over-winter and because as a legume, they fix nitrogen in the soil.

Favas — also known as Windsor beans, English beans, horse beans, and pigeon beans — have long been diet staples in Asia, the Middle East, South America, North Africa and Europe. They were the only beans Europeans ate before they discovered America and all its legumes. The beans have a buttery texture, slight bitterness and lovely, nutty flavor.

Fava beans can be served simply boiled, mashed and spread on crostini, or added to spring stews and soups. And, favas are nutrition superheroes. They are high in fiber and iron, and low in sodium and fat. They have no cholesterol but are high in protein.

some fava recpies:

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Pests in the Garden

We all know that some of the bugs we find in our garden are pests and they damage our beloved crops that we work so hard to grow. It can be frustrating and disappointing to find evidence that some type of pest has been eating at your plants, or perhaps has already destroyed a crop.

The most important first step you can take to manage pests is to monitor your garden closely and regularly. Check plants for signs of pests at least twice a week throughout the growing season. Pay extra close attention to young plants that are just sprouting or were recently transplanted. Look at the undersides of leaves and at the inner stalks of plants and inspect for any holes in foliage. Many insects that feed on your crops are easiest to manage early on, when their populations are still minimal.

The second step to managing pests is to identify the culprit. Try to identify what bug might be damaging plants by collecting as much information as you can. Look for any bugs that are around the plants: either on them, in the ground nearby, or flying around. Pay close attention to their appearance: color, size, and any other defining characteristics.

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Meet Lincoln Farmers Kadeem and Amanda

each week two of our Lincoln youth interns will introduce themselves

Hello, my name is Kadeem and I’m 18 years old from Dorchester. I am a senior at Wayland High School through Boston’s METCO program and I play football and run track. This is my second summer working at the Food Project. Now as a Lincoln intern, I hope that working on the farm will expand my knowledge about agriculture. During the Summer Youth Program last year I learned how to be a better farmer by weeding and harvesting. My favorite vegetable is broccoli.

Hello, my name is Amanda Chin. I’m 17 years old and just graduated from Arlington High School. This fall I’m heading over to the University of Vermont. I participated in the Summer Youth Program in 2009 and now am working as a Lincoln intern. For this summer I love being part of The Food Project community and working on the land as well as learning more about the food we eat and harvest. My favorite vegetables are green beans.

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