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from the fields

The Food Project's blog

5K Run to Support FoodCorps - Sunday, 9/18


download:      a flyer          a brochure         a registration form

 

Register to run/walk  or  Sponsor someone to run   

wholefoodsmarket5k.com

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Join Les Dames d’Escoffier for Feast on a Farm

Farm to Table Dinner

hosted by Les Dames d’Escoffier, Boston Chapter

download a flyer
 

Saturday, September 17, 2011
6:00 p.m. ‐ 10:00 p.m.
Verrill Farm in Concord

Live Music & Dancing
Silent Auction to benefit The Food Project and Future Chefs
$68.00 per person

Purchase tickets at www.lesdamesboston.org

 

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Reflections on RIC 2011

The following blog was written by TFP Intern Keron Cruz. Keron, along with fellow intern Keely Curliss, represented The Food Project at the RIC (Rooted in Community) conference in late July 2011.

Two weeks ago, my coworker, Keely Curliss, and I had the opportunity to participate at the RIC (Rooted in Community) conference in Philadelphia, PA. The purpose of RIC is to bring together organizations all over the country who work in trying to make a difference in the food system and to learn from one another and promote the movement of food justice.

Despite working at The Food Project for about three-and-a-half years, I had never been involved in a conference where I had the chance to see organizations similar to The Food Project trying to create change. I had no idea what to expect from RIC and by the time the conference came to an end, I learned that there are hundreds on youth like myself who are working hard for a better tomorrow.

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Interns in the Garden

[The first part of this blog was written by Sylvia, a TFP summer intern. In the second part, Sylvia is the featured gardener in this month’s installment of "A Week in My Garden."]

TFP Intern Sylvia at work on her raised-bed garden.
TFP Intern Sylvia at work on her raised-bed garden.
My name is Sylvia and I am one of the twelve Boston interns at The Food Project. Our internship is divided into three groups in which we rotate: Agriculture (AG), Teaching through Agriculture (TAG), and Build-a-Garden (BaG).

During our time in AG we get the opportunity to teach community members about the food system through our Food Choices Workshop. As part of TAG, we have the opportunity to educate and inform children from the ages of 5 to 18 about healthy food choices at our Urban Learning Farm (ULF).

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Pre-order Garlic Now for Fall Planting

A head of freshly harvested garlic with many more to clean!
A head of freshly harvested garlic with many more to clean!

With all of this talk about harvesting garlic, I'm sure many of you are eager to grow it for the first time or plant even more than last year! We will be announcing our Compost & Garlic Fest in next month's newsletter, and in the meantime plan ahead. We'll be ordering seed garlic for planting. To guarantee garlic, you must pre-order.

How to Pre-Order:

Each head of garlic will be $5, and generally 1 head covers about 1 square foot in a raised bed. To pre-order, please mail a check made out to The Food Project by August 31. Please include your name, email and/or phone number, and # of garlic heads you'd like.


Send checks to:

The Food Project
Attn: Kathleen Banfield
555 Dudley St
Dorchester Ma, 02125

Questions? Email buildagarden@thefoodproject.org

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One Click, $100,000 for Real Food

Dear Food Project Friends and Supporters,

We have some exciting news – our own David Schwartz of the Real Food Challenge is one of five finalists for the VH1 Do Something Award! If David wins, the Real Food Challenge will get $100,000 to help galvanize this movement to bring fresh, local food to college campuses. The award will be presented on a national live broadcast on VH1, bringing the message of the Real Food Challenge to a huge audience!

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2004 World Series Trophy Visits TFP

Mayor Menino and TFP youth with the trophy that ended the curse!
Mayor Menino and TFP youth with the trophy that ended the curse!
At our first 2011 Community Lunch in Boston, everyone got a special surprise: Red Sox Executive Chef Nookie Postal, who cooked the delicious meal, brought along the 2004 World Series trophy!

The event was held Monday, July 18, on The Food Project’s urban farm in Dorchester. Every summer, TFP hosts Community Lunches in all the communities where we work. All lunches feature delicious meals prepared by local chefs using freshly picked Food Project vegetables. In addition to their time, chefs generously donate other food items. Chef Postal went above and beyond in bringing along the trophy that ended the curse!

Chef Postal is thanked with TFP gear.
Chef Postal is thanked with TFP gear.
Chef Postal's delicious meal was served to top city officials, including Mayor Menino, Superintendent of Schools Carol Johnson, and Public Health Commission Director Barbara Ferrer.

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A Week in My Garden: Guest Spotlight

James Modi has a unique gardening arrangement at his Lynn home. Through a partnership with the GRO Project (Gardening through Refugee Organizations) and The Food Project, he shares 20 raised beds with almost 20 gardeners from his native Sudan, many of whom were small scale farmers in rural areas back home. Stemming from a need for their ethnic foods (think sweet potato leaf) and a desire to continue their farming tradition, the garden is tended and harvested communally - extra produce is sold at the New American Center in Lynn, providing supplementary income for many.

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Cucumbers Don't Play Nice

My first cucumber of the season.
My first cucumber of the season.

Container Kit Update

 

A few tasty snacks came from my container kit in June. I harvested several cucumbers which had the best crunch and were so tasty! And I had several ripe tomatoes so I made a delicious batch of salsa, which calmed an anxious group of friends joining me for a Bruins hockey playoff game.


Cucumber plant strangling my tomatoes.
Cucumber plant strangling my tomatoes.

 


One alert I have for container gardeners - if you are growing cucumbers and using the attachable cage that we gave you, note that the vine will most likely outgrow the cage. You should still be able to get a decent harvest. Be careful to keep the cucumber pot away from other plants - in this picture, the cucumber vine is wrapped around a tomato plant. I cut it off and moved the cucumber pot about 5 feet away from the tomatoes.

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Spotlight on Collards

Those hardy greens that grow on a stalk through late fall are an awesome plant to have in your garden. They can provide you food well into the winter. For many southern families these "greens" are a staple. Here is a recipe adapted from my mother's kitchen.

Southern Style Collard Greens

by Joy

1 tablespoon Butter
1 tablespoon Olive oil
2-3 Bunches of collards
1lb smoked turkey necks or any smoked meat (i.e. bacon, duck breast, etc.)
3-5 quarts of vegetable stock
onions
garlic
salt and pepper (to taste)

In a large pot over medium heat, heat oil and butter. Saute the onions until slightly softened, about 2 minutes, then add the smoked turkey necks and garlic, cook another minute. Add collard greens and cook another minute. Add the vegetable stock, cover and bring to a simmer. Cook until greens are tender, about 40 minutes. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper and serve.

Collard greens sauteed in coconut oil

by Kathleen

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