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Food Day Tour Highlights Agriculture in Dudley

Anna, Anthony, and Eli Lead the Tour
Anna, Anthony, and Eli Lead the Tour
On Saturday, Food Project staff, interns, community partners, and guests meandered their way around the Dudley Hub, visiting and learning about the various urban agriculture initiatives in the neighborhood. As they walked, they discussed the neighborhood highlights they saw, their own experiences with food and agriculture, and the implications of urban agriculture on this neighborhood and on the rest of the city. At one site, they paused to applaud a community gardener who had taken over an abandoned plot and donated the food he grew to hunger relief in his community. At another, they learned about the native Roxbury Russet apple variety, one of the oldest apple varieties cultivated in the United States.

The event, called "Grown In Dudley" was part of The Food Project's series of events in honor of Food Day 2012. The tour started in the Dudley Greenhouse, where guests participated in a food systems and food justice workshop led by TFP youth interns Ian Chin, Thalia Valverde, and Zeke Mercer-McDowall. Following the workshop, interns Eli Gurvitch, Anna McColgan, and Anthony Boisaubin took over to lead the group on a tour of the neighborhood.

Passing the S. Eustice Orchard
Passing the S. Eustice Orchard
The tour wound through the streets of Roxbury and Dorchester, stopping at the Dudley Greenhouse, the Julian, Judson, Dean community garden, the Shirley Eustice House, and The Food Project’s farms on West Cottage Street and Langdon Street. In between, the guides highlighted partner organizations such as the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and the Boston Natural Areas Network, as well as smaller-scale growing operations such as community members' gardens and raised bed gardens.

"The people [at the event] were really surprised by what they saw and learned about," says TFP Community Programs Associate Allison Daminger. "There is a lot more going on in this neighborhood than you might think." In the spirit of Food Day, participants got to see the many different ways that healthy, affordable, and sustainably food is produced in the Dudley neighborhood, from a historic orchard and a thriving community greenhouse to urban farms and community gardens. As they went along, they had the opportunity to meet and appreciate the people, places, and organizations that make it all happen.

 

How are you celebrating Food Day 2012? The Food Project will be participating in several events in the coming week. Check out the Food Day website to find events in your area.