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NS CSA Newsletter Week 6

Vegetable of the Week: Broccoli

broccoli
broccoli
 Believe it or not, broccoli was barely known in the US until the 1920's. It's a snap to cook and delicious and nutritious. Serve it raw, lightly cooked or completely cooked. One other thing to believe or not: broccoli is a flower--a bunch of flowers to be exact. All those tiny buds just haven't opened yet. If we let our broccoli plants keep growing in the fields without harvesting them, they'd eventually erupt into a lovely bouquet of tiny yellow flowers.

Broccoli is a plant of the cabbage family Brassicaceae. Broccoli most closely resembles cauliflower, which is a different cultivar group of the same species, but broccoli is green while cauliflower can appear in purple and yellow in addition to the traditional white variety. Packing a nutritional punch, broccoli is high in vitamins A, C, and K as well as dietary fiber.

To prepare: Strip the stalk of leaves, if any are present. (These are perfectly edible; cook along with the tops if you like.) Cut off the dried-out end of the stalk and use a vegetable peeler or paring knife to peel the tough outer skin as best you can without going crazy.

Best cooking methods: Steaming, boiling, braising, braising and glazing, sauteing, and stir-frying are all good. Regardless of the method, it often makes sense to cook the stalks longer than the florets; just start them a minute or two earlier.

Broccoli is a plant of the cabbage family Brassicaceae. Broccoli most closely resembles cauliflower, which is a different cultivar group of the same species, but broccoli is green while cauliflower can appear in purple and yellow in addition to the traditional white variety. Packing a nutritional punch, broccoli is high in vitamins A, C, and K as well as dietary fiber.

Broccoli Sauteed in Wine and Garlic

6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
3 pounds broccoli, cut into spears
1 cup Frascati or other dry white wine
1 tablespoon hot red pepper flakes
Grated zest of 1 lemon
Grated zest of 1 orange

In a 10- to 12-inch sauté pan, heat the olive oil with the garlic over medium-high heat until just sizzling. Add the broccoli and cook, tossing frequently and gradually adding the wine to keep the garlic from browning until the stalks are tender 8 to 10 minutes. Add the red pepper flakes and zests, and tossing well, serve immediately.

from Molto Italiano: 327 Simple Italian Recipes to Cook at Home

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